This prevents the face of a dead person or a severed hand from being used to overcome biometric identification systems.This prevents the face of a dead person or a severed hand from being used to overcome biometric identification systems.





Facebook will allow to know and control the personal information it receives from other websites Facebook will allow to know and control the personal information it receives from other websites.

Facebook disables facial recognition by default, instead of automatically scanning user faces Facebook disables facial recognition by default, instead of automatically scanning user faces.

Facebook has announced a few hours ago that, from this moment, its facial recognition technology, available since 2017 for a small percentage of users as a future alternative of ‘labeling suggestions’, will finally be available to 100% of users.

This technology allows us to know if another user has uploaded a photo in which we appear, or if someone has appropriated our profile picture. In short, it will provide the user with greater control over their image and their own content.

The few users who already had this function activated will be provided with deactivation and the rest, as it is activated in each case (accompanied by an explanatory notification) will be delivered deactivated ‘by default’.

In return, Facebook will suppress tagging suggestions, a feature that relied on facial recognition only to encourage the user to tag their friends if they appeared in the photos.

The US Federal Trade Commission had already ‘drawn attention’ to Facebook with regard to this functionality: it describes as “misleading” to call a suggestion a function activated by default. Within the framework of its agreement with the company after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the FTC imposed new rules on how Facebook should use facial recognition technology in the future, forcing a ‘clear and visible warning’ of its use.

This also adds to the legal problems that the company has been generating, after in 2015 a user from Illinois (USA) sued them for violating a state law on the privacy of biometric information.

In addition, the company lost only a few days ago an appeal in which the lawsuit was tried to be dismissed… and could still have to compensate up to 7 million people if it loses.